Building External Libraries with Boost Build

I recently ran into the problem of having to use an external library not available for our distribution. Of course, it would be possible to build Debian or RPM packages, deploy them, and then link against those. However, building sanely-behaving library packages is tricky.

The easier way is to include the source distribution in a sub-folder of the project and integrate it into our build system, Boost Build. It seemed prohibitive to create Boost Build rules to build the library from scratch (from *.cpp to *.a/*.so) because the library had fairly complex build requirements. The way to go was to leverage the library's own build system.

Easier said than done. I only arrived at a fully integrated solution after seeking help on the Boost Build Mailing List (thanks Steven, Vladimir). This is the core of it:

path-constant LIBSQUARE_DIR : . ;

make libsquare.a
    : [ glob-tree *.c *.cpp *.h : generated-file.c gen-*.cpp ]
    : @build-libsquare
    ;
actions build-libsquare
{
    ( cd $(LIBSQUARE_DIR) && make )
    cp $(LIBSQUARE_DIR)/libsquare.a $(<)
}

alias libsquare
    : libsquare.a                                        # sources
    :                                                    # requirements
    :                                                    # default-build
    : <include>$(LIBSQUARE_DIR) <dependency>libsquare.a  # usage-requirements
    ;

The first line defines a filesystem constant for the library directory, so the build process becomes independent of the working directory.

The next few lines tell Boost Build about a library called libsquare.a, which is built by calling make. The cp command copies the library to the target location expected by Boost Build ($(<)). glob-tree defines source files that should trigger library rebuilds when changed, taking care to exclude files generated by the build process itself.

The alias command defines a Boost Build target to link against the library. The real magic is the <dependency>libsquare.a directive: it is required because the library build may produce header files used by client code. Thus, build-libsquare must run before compiling any dependent C++ files. Adding libsquare.a to an executable's dependency list won't quite enforce this: it only builds libsquare.a in time for the linking step (*.oexecutable), but not for the compilation (*.cpp*.o). In contrast, the <dependency>libsquare.a directive propagates to all dependent build steps, including the compilation, and induces the required dependencies.

I created an example project on GitHub that demonstrates this. It builds a simple executable relying on a library built via make. The process is fully integrated in the Boost Build framework and triggered by a single call to bjam (or bb2).

If you need something along these lines give this solution a try!


Boost Range Highlights

Last week, I presented Boost Range for Humans: documentation for the Boost Range library with concrete code examples. This week we'll talk about some of the cool features in Boost Range.

irange

boost::irange() is the C++ equivalent to Python's range() function. It returns a range object containing an arithmetic series of numbers:

boost::irange(4, 10)    -> {4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
boost::irange(4, 10, 2) -> {4, 6, 8}

Together with indexed() (see below), it serves as a range-based alternative to the classic C for loop.

combine

boost::combine() takes two or more input ranges and creates a zipped range – a range of tuples where each tuple contains corresponding elements from each input range.

The input ranges must have equal size.

std::string str = "abcde";
std::vector<int> vec = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
for (const auto & zipped : boost::combine(str, vec)) {
    char c; int i;
    boost::tie(c, i) = zipped;

    // Iterates over the pairs ('a', 1), ('b', 2), ...
}

Algorithms

Most if not all algorithms from the C++ standard library that apply to containers (via begin/end iterator pairs) have been wrapped in Boost Range. Examples include copy(), remove(), sort(), count(), find_if().

Adaptors

Adaptors are among the most interesting concepts Boost Range has to offer.

There are generally two ways to use adaptors, either via function syntax or via a pipe syntax. While the former is handy for simple cases, while the latter allows chaining data transformations into an easy-to-read pipeline.

bool is_even(int n) { return n % 2 == 0; }
const std::vector<int> vec = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

// Function-style call:
for (int i : boost::adaptors::filter(vec, is_even)) { ... }

// Pipe-style call:
for (int i : vec | boost::adaptors::filtered(is_even)) { ... }

To see the power of the latter syntax, consider a transformation pipeline:

int square(int n) { return n*n; }
std::map<int, int> input_map = { ... };

using boost::adaptors;
auto result = input_map | map_values
                        | filtered(is_even)
                        | transformed(square);

indexed

The boost::adaptors::indexed() adapter warrants special mention: it is analogous to Python's enumerate(). Given a Range, it gives access to the elements as well as their index within the range. Boost 1.56 or higher is required for this to work properly.

accumulate

boost::accumulate() by default sums all the items in an input range, but other reduction functions can be supplied as well. Together with range adapters, this makes map-reduce pipelines easy to write.

std::vector<int> vec = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
int product = boost::accumulate(vec, 1, std::multiplies<int>());

as_literal

boost::as_literal() may be less a highlight and more of a crutch, but it bears mentioning still. Boost Range functions accept a wide variety of types, among them strings. C++ style strings (std::string) always work as expected, but with character arrays (char[]), there is an ambiguity as to whether the argument should be interpreted as array (including the terminal '\0' character) or as string (excluding the terminator).

By default, Boost Range treats them as arrays, which they are, after all. In practice, this is often a pitfall for newcomers. If any string-related range operations don't work as expected, this is a common reason.

To force the library to treat character arrays as strings, they can be wrapped in an as_literal() call. Alternatively, the C strings can be cast to std::string as well.

Summary

There are several interesting aspects about Boost Range. It plays very well with C++11's range-based for loops and makes code operating on containers much easier to write and (most importantly) read. In addition, it makes it possible to lay out data processing pipelines a lot more clearly.

Container iteration and modification becomes as easy as it is in modern scripting languages, which is a huge, huge step for the C++ language.

Let's hope that C++17 brings similar capabilities in the standard library. Until then, Boost Range is the way to go, so check out the docs and try it yourself.


Boost Range for Humans

Boost Range encapsulates the common C++ pattern of passing begin/end iterators around by combining them into into a single range object. It makes code that operates on containers much more readable. One wonders why such functionality was not included in the C++ standard library in the first place, and indeed, similar ideas could be added to C++17, see N4128 and Ivan Cukic's Meeting C++ presentation. In my opinion, Boost Range is something that every C++ programmer should know about.

The library is reasonably well documented, but I was often missing concrete code examples and an explicit mention what headers are required for which function. Since this presumably happens to other people as well, I invested the time to change that situation.

Thus, I present Boost Range for Humans. It contains working example code for every function in Boost Range, along with required headers and links to the official documentation and the latest source code. I hope it will make Boost Range more accessible and furthers its adoption.

Next week, we'll look into some of the highlights of what Boost Range can offer.