perf-tools is a collection of scripts for system-wide tracing on Linux. It's really, really cool. It's what the perf command should have included from day one, but didn't.

It is packaged in Debian and Ubuntu, but those versions miss some key features. As perf-tools consists of shell scripts (no compilation necessary), I recommend using the GitHub version directly:

git clone https://github.com/brendangregg/perf-tools.git

Two tools that are included are execsnoop and opensnoop, which trace new program executions and open() calls across the whole system.

$ sudo ./execsnoop
TIME        PID   PPID ARGS
21:12:56  22898  15674 ls --color=auto -la
21:12:56  22899  15674 git rev-parse --is-inside-work-tree
21:12:56  22900  15674 git rev-parse --git-dir
...

$ sudo ./opensnoop
Tracing open()s. Ctrl-C to end.
COMM             PID      FD FILE
opensnoop        22924   0x3 /etc/ld.so.cache
gawk             22924   0x3 /usr/lib/locale/locale-archive
top              15555   0x8 /proc/1/stat
...

Maybe the most interesting tool is uprobe. It's magic: it traces function calls in arbitrary user-space programs. With debugging symbols available, it can trace practically every function in a program. Without them, it can trace exported functions or arbitrary code locations (specified by raw address). It can also trace library code, e.g. libc). Having these possibilities on a production system without any prior setup is staggering.

$ sudo user/uprobe -F -l /tmp/a.out | grep quicksort
_Z9quicksortN9__gnu_cxx17__normal_iteratorIPiSt6vectorIiSaIiEEEES5_
$ sudo user/uprobe -F p:/tmp/a.out:_Z9quicksortN9__gnu_cxx17__normal_iteratorIPiSt6vectorIiSaIiEEEES5_
Tracing uprobe _Z9quicksort[snip] (p:_Z9quicksort[snip] /tmp/a.out:0x8ba). Ctrl-C to end.
   a.out-23171 [000] d... 1860355.891238: _Z9quicksort[snip]: (0x80488ba)
   a.out-23171 [000] d... 1860355.891353: _Z9quicksort[snip]: (0x80488ba)
   ...

(To demangle the C++ function names, use the c++filt tool.)

perf-tools really shows the power of the Linux perf/ftrace infrastructure, and make it usable for the broad masses. There are several other tools that analyze latency and cache hit rates, trace kernel functions, and much more. To finally have such functionality in Linux is fabulous!


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